Mayba | FAQ
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FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

We have all answers for your questions

Mayba Dental is a boutique dental clinic located in Kochi, Kerala, that is dedicated to providing exceptional dental care to all our patients. We always strive for delivering the best results possible, and providing the type of service that makes our patients smile! We offer affordable, quality implant and cosmetic dentistry services in our state-of-the-art clinic

The process of getting implants requires a number of visits over several months.
X-rays and impressions (molds) are taken of the jaw and teeth to determine bone, gum tissue, and spacing available for an implant. While the area is numb, the implant will be surgically placed into the bone and allowed to heal and integrate itself onto the bone for up to six months. Depending on the type of implant, a second surgery may be required in order to place the “post” that will hold the artificial tooth in place. With other implants the post and anchor are already attached and placed at the same time.
After several weeks of healing the artificial teeth are made and fitted to the post portion of the anchor. Because several fittings may be required, this step may take one to two months to complete. After a healing period, the artificial teeth are securely attached to the implant, providing excellent stability and comfort to the patient.
You will receive care instructions when your treatment is completed. Good oral hygiene, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new implant.

The teeth are held firmly in place by strong roots that extend into the jawbone. Molars and premolars tend to have several roots, whereas the front incisors only have a single root. The end or tip of each root is termed the apex. The apex is where the nerves and blood vessels enter the tooth, and aids in the delivery of blood to the crown (the part of the tooth you can see in your mouth).

A root canal treatment refers to the cleaning of the canals and the removal of infected and inflamed tissue within the root. When the inflammation or infection persists after the root canal treatment, an apicoectomy may be required. An apicoectomy is essentially the removal of the apex (or root tip), followed by a filling procedure to seal the root from further infection. When left untreated, infected roots can damage other teeth, spread infection, and cause regression of the jawbone.

Reasons for an apicoectomy

Infected and inflamed soft tissue around the root of a tooth can be exceptionally painful and debilitating to the patient. The purpose of an apicoectomy is to eliminate the infection in the tissue and to ultimately preserve the function of the tooth and save it from extraction. An apicoectomy will rarely be considered by the dentist unless a prior root canal treatment has failed.

There are several reasons why an apicoectomy may be necessary:

Small Adjoining Root Branches – Roots are extremely complex and can contain many tiny branches. If these tiny branches cannot be cleaned and sealed when the root canal treatment is performed, inflammation can persist.

Blocked Root Canal – In some cases, the dentist is unable to effectively clean a root canal because it is blocked by a fractured file left behind from prior root canal treatment. Infection and debris can quickly affect adjacent teeth.

Narrow or Curved Root Canals – When the root canal is poorly shaped, the endodontic files cannot reach the root tip. Continuing infection or re-infection can then occur.

What does getting an apicoectomy involve?

Prior to the surgery, the dentist will generally prescribe an antibiotic or anti-inflammatory medication to treat the underlying infection. Panoramic x-rays will then be taken to enable the dentist to plan the apicoectomy, which will be performed under local anesthesia.
The dentist will make a small incision in the gum and expose the root by lifting away the gum. In some cases, a tiny fraction of the jawbone may be removed to properly expose the root. The edge of the root tip and any infected connective tissue will be removed using ultrasonic instruments. The root will be sealed using a retrofill (filling material) and the dentist will suture the gum with several stitches.
This surgery does not require an overnight stay, and full aftercare instructions and pain medications will be provided as needed. After several days, the dentist will remove the stitches, and the connective tissues will fully heal several months after the procedure.
If you are experiencing any signs or symptoms, such as pain or swelling associated with a tooth that has had a root canal, we encourage you to contact our office immediately to schedule an appointment.

Wisdom teeth removal is a common procedure, generally performed under local anesthesia, intravenous (IV) sedation, or general anesthesia by a specially trained dentist in an office surgery suite. The surgery does not require an overnight stay, and you will be released with post-operative instructions and medication (if necessary), to help manage any swelling or discomfort.

What is a laser and how does it work?

A laser is an instrument that produces a very narrow, intense beam of light energy. When laser light comes in contact with tissue, it causes a reaction. The light produced by the laser can remove or shape tissue.

Are lasers used in dentistry?

Yes, lasers have been used in dentistry since 1990. Lasers can be used as a safe and effective treatment for a wide range of dental procedures and are often used in conjunction with other dental instruments.

How are lasers used in dentistry?

Dental lasers can be used to:

reduce the discomfort of canker and cold sores. expose partially erupted wisdom teeth.
remove muscle attachments that limit proper movement.
manage gum tissue during impressions for crowns or other procedures.
remove overgrown tissues caused by certain medications
perform biopsy procedures.
remove inflamed gum tissues and aid in the treatment of gum disease.
remove or reshape gum and bone tissues during crown lengthening procedures.
help treat infections in root canals.

speed up tooth whitening procedures.

What are the benefits of using dental lasers?

There are several advantages. Dentists may not need to use a drill or administer anesthesia in some procedures, allowing the patient to enjoy a more relaxed dental experience. Laser procedures can be more precise. Also, lasers can reduce symptoms and healing times associated with traditional therapies; reduce the amount of bacteria in both diseased gum tissue and in tooth cavities; and control bleeding during surgery.

Are dental lasers safe?

If the dental laser is used according to accepted practices by a trained practitioner, then it is at least as safe as other dental instruments. However, just as you wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from prolonged exposure to the sun, when your dentist performs a laser procedure, you will be asked to wear special eyeglasses to protect your eyes from the laser.

Hollywood Smile is a smile makeover. It's a Supra Natural White, perfectly aligned attractive looking teeth. It takes in consideration the skin color, the gum position, the front teeth color and size, and of course the position of the upper teeth with the lower lip.

How do they do it?

Recently a complete dental makeover with individual crowns was only possible for millionaires, Hollywood stars and celebrities. The material used for those Hollywood teeth is incredibly thin and lets light shine through. The teeth fit perfectly flush with the gums. The form and surface structure of each tooth perfectly matches their personality and image.

Procera teeth: the teeth of the stars; each tooth is individually made using computer-aided technology and coloured by hand. Wellness Kliniek dentistry is particularly specialised in complete dental makeovers.

How soon should I see a dentist?

Immediately. Getting to a dentist within 30 minutes can make the difference between saving or losing a tooth.

What should I do when a tooth is knocked out?

Immediately call your dentist for an emergency appointment.
Handle the tooth by the crown, not the root. Touching the root (the part of the tooth below the gum) can damage cells necessary for bone reattachment.
Gently rinse the tooth in water to remove dirt. Do not scrub.
If possible, gently place the clean tooth in the socket to keep it moist. It is important not to let the tooth dry out.
If it is not possible to store the tooth in the mouth of the injured person, wrap the tooth in a clean cloth or gauze and immerse in milk or saliva.

What should I do when a tooth is pushed out of position?

Attempt to re position the tooth to its normal alignment using very light finger pressure, but do not force the tooth.
Bite down to keep the tooth from moving.

What should I do when a tooth is fractured?

Rinse mouth with warm water.
Use an ice pack or cold compress to reduce swelling.
Use ibuprofen, not aspirin, for pain.
Immediately get to your dentist, who will determine treatment based on how badly the tooth is broken. Only a dentist can tell how bad the break is.

Minor fracture: Minor fractures can be smoothed by your dentist or simply left alone. Another option is to restore the tooth with a composite restoration. In either case, treat the tooth with care for several days.

Moderate fracture: Moderate fractures include damage to the enamel, dentin and/or pulp (nerve and other live tissues). If the pulp is not permanently damaged, the tooth may be restored with a full permanent crown. If damage to the pulp does occur, further dental treatment will be required.

Severe fracture: Severe fractures often mean a traumatized tooth with slim chance of recovery.

What should I do when tissue is injured?

Injuries to the inside of the mouth include tears, puncture wounds and lacerations to the cheek, lips or tongue. The wound should be cleaned right away with warm water, and the injured person taken to a hospital emergency room for the necessary care. Bleeding from a tongue laceration can be reduced by pulling the tongue forward and using gauze to place pressure on the wound.

Clear aligners are a great alternative for patients who want a straighter smile but do not want to wear traditional metal braces or for patients who have had orthodontic treatment in the past and want to make minor corrections to their smile. There are several advantages to using clear aligners:

-Clear aligners are removable so it is easier for you to brush and floss after meals
-Clear aligners are easier to keep clean
-Clear aligners are comfortable and less likely to irritate your gums and cheeks
-Clear aligners can prevent tooth wear from grinding

Tempro-Mandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome (TMJ) is a common condition affecting a wide variety of people. TMJ is characterized by severe headaches, jaw pain of varying degrees, grinding teeth, and an intermittent ringing in the ears. The vast majority of TMJ sufferers are unaware that the root cause of these problems is something that a dentist can effectively treat.

The symptoms of TMJ are debilitating and can greatly interfere with every day life. The comfort and general well being of the patient is at the heart of the dental practice, so pain relief is the first consideration of the dentist. The dentist is able to test, diagnose, and devise an immediate plan to treat the underlying causes of the TMJ disorder.

Reasons for treating TMJ

TMJ sufferers report that their symptoms generally worsen during periods of prolonged or unexpected stress, and that intense outbreaks of the condition can lead to neck pain and dizziness.

The most common cause of TMJ is the misalignment of the teeth, often called “bad bite.” It is possible for the dentist to realign or adjust the teeth without the need for painful or expensive surgeries. The realignment/adjustment will stop the pounding headaches, the jaw pain, and the dizziness.

The grinding teeth symptom is particularly common and usually occurs at night. The grinding will eventually erode the structure of the teeth and lead to much more severe dental problems in the future. Untreated TMJ is one of the prime underlying factors in eroded jawbones and loose teeth.

It is important for anyone experiencing the symptoms of TMJ to visit the dentist for an exact diagnosis.

What does treating TMJ involve?

TMJ could be a result of several different problems. Bad bite is the most common, but an injury resulting from a blow to the meniscus cartilage is also a possibility. Initially, the dentist will thoroughly examine the jaw area, the patients bite, take x-rays, and review the patient’s history in order to make an accurate diagnosis and recommend necessary treatment.

Once a firm diagnosis is attained, there are several ways in which relief can be provided. A specially molded bite guard can be created to stop teeth grinding during the night. A bite relationship analysis may be recommended by the dentist. The dentist can also provide advice on relaxation techniques which will lessen the effects of stress. As a last alternative, the dentist is also able to prescribe muscle relaxants.

A better option is to change the shape of the teeth and get rid of the bad bite completely, often called “realignment.” This is especially useful because it alleviates TMJ symptoms and may improve the aesthetic appearance of the teeth as well. Realignment involves adjusting the relationship between how the upper teeth come together with the lower teeth. This may require new restorations and/or adjusting the natural teeth as well. It is not a painful procedure, and it is one the dentist has performed with great success numerous times. As with any procedure, the dentist will be happy to answer questions and discuss symptoms, options, and treatments.

If you are experiencing any symptoms of TMJ, we encourage you to contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

If you are experiencing extreme sensitivity or are suffering from advanced periodontal disease, you may be required to have a tooth extracted. With a simple extraction, the dentist can safely remove the affected tooth without the need for major surgery. Reasons for a tooth extraction

There are numerous situations in which a simple extraction can help alleviate pain or prepare you for another cosmetic or restorative procedure. Some common reasons for extraction include:

-Advanced periodontal disease that has loosened the tooth roots
-Extra teeth or baby teeth that impede adult teeth
-Preparing a patient for orthodontic treatment
-Removing a fractured or malformed tooth
-Severe tooth decay which cannot be remedied with root canal therapy

How is a tooth extracted?

As a precaution, the dentist will first take X-rays of the tooth or teeth in question, to help plan the procedure. After preparing a method of extraction, you will be given a local anesthetic that will prevent you from feeling pain during the procedure. Next, the dentist will use a tool called an elevator to lift the tooth and loosen ligaments and gum tissue around the base of the tooth. Finally, the dentist will use a pair of forceps, to gently rock the tooth back and forth until it breaks free of the ligaments holding it in the gum tissue. Occasionally, a stubborn tooth will resist the dentist’s soft tug, refusing to come out. In these and more complex cases, the tooth may need to be broken up into smaller pieces for removal.

Once removed, we will pack gauze into the socket and have you place pressure on the area by biting down. If necessary, the dentist will place stitches to close the socket. If you are sick the week prior to your scheduled extraction or on the day of, please contact our office, as alternative arrangements may need to be made. Please contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

Where can i get tooth Extraction?

All 1st Family Dental offices offer tooth extractions as a part of our comprehensive oral health services.

Are tooth extractions painful? What can I expect?

Some pain, swelling and bleeding are to be expected after most extractions. Each extraction is different and everyone experiences pain and recovery differently. Your dentist or our staff may have provided you a post-extraction instruction guide after your procedure. This guide contains helpful information to make your recovery as speedy and complete as possible and avoid common issues such as dry sockets or pulled sutures.

Your dentist will also explain what signs to look for that may tell you it’s time to call our office. If you had a surgical extraction, we may give you a post-op courtesy call a day or two after your procedure to see how you are feeling or if you have any questions. We are happy to answer questions any time at your local 1st Family Dental office, and our 24-hour on-call dentist is always available for a phone consultation.

Zygomatic implants are used in the upper jaw when there is insufficient bone for ordinary implants. They provide support for implant bridgework where there has been a substantial amount of bone loss from the upper jaw, and ordinary implants cannot be used on their own to support a bridge.

The implants are longer than ordinary dental implants and ‘anchor’ to the very strong bulk of bone that forms the cheekbone, or zygomatic arch – hence their name. This means that the implants can be used as an alternative to complex bone grafting operations, making it possible to carry out surgery in just one stage. Prior to zygomatic implant surgery, a CBCT scan will be taken to assess the amount of bone available in the upper jaw and allow us to plan the placement of these implants.

It is also possible to make an anatomical model of your jaw, which enables us to visualise the precise shape of the jaw and cheekbone, without having to carry out wide surgical exposure. Typically, two zygomatic implants are used along with 2-4 ordinary implants. Where bone availability is even more limited, four zygomatic implants may be used.

Guided surgery may even be used to assist accurate placement of zygomatic implants. A fixed composite bridge may be fitted on the same day as implant placement, allowing patients a permanent alternative to their dentures in just one day.

-Wisdom teeth removal
-Dental extractions
-Orthodontic extractions and tooth uncovering
-Dental implants and jaw reconstruction in preparation for dental implants
-Jaw surgery to correct jaw alignment and facial profile
-Salivary gland surgery
-Surgery for oral pathology, including jaw cysts and soft tissue swelling
-Trauma to the face, mouth and jaws
-Diagnosis and management of oral disease, including tumours and growths

An oral exam is routinely performed by the dentist during the course of an initial comprehensive exam and regular check-ups. An oral cancer exam refers to the identification and management of diseases pertaining to the maxillofacial and oral regions.

The soft tissue of the mouth is normally lined with mucosa, which is special type of skin that should appear smooth in texture and pink in color. Any alteration of the color or texture of the mucosa may signal the beginning of a pathologic process. These changes may occur on the face, neck, and areas of the mouth (e.g., gums, tongue, lips, etc.). The most serious of these pathologic changes (which may or may not be painful) is oral cancer, but there are also many other common pathologic problems.

Geographic Tongue – Also known as Benign Migratory Glossitis or Erythema Migrans, is a condition where the tongue is missing papillae (small bumps) in different areas, and a map-like appearance can develop. This condition is usually seen as red well defined areas on or around the sides of the tongue. The red patches (which can look like an unsightly rash) may come and go from hours to months at a time and cause increased sensitivity to certain substances.

Median Palatal Cyst – This cyst is of developmental origin and is essentially a fluid filled skin sac. It usually appears in the middle of the palate and may cause substantial discomfort.

Hairy Tongue – An overgrowth of bacteria or a yeast infection in the mouth which can cause the tongue to appear hairy and black. This condition is usually a result of poor oral hygiene, chronic or extensive use of antibiotics, or radiation treatments to the head or neck. It is often also seen in HIV positive patients and those who are intravenous drug users. Hairy Tongue may or may not require treatment.

Treatment of Pathological Diseases

In the majority of cases, the pathological changes experienced in the oral region are uncomfortable and disfiguring, but not life threatening. However, oral cancer is on the rise (especially among men) and the chances of survival are around 80% if an immediate diagnosis is made.

Oral cancer is a general term used when referring to any type of cancer affecting the tongue, jaw, and lower cheek area. Since it is impossible for the dentist to decisively diagnose a pathological disease without taking a biopsy sample of the affected area, seeking immediate treatment when changes are first noticed might be a life and death decision. For less serious problems, there are several options available, such as:

Antibiotics – In the case of a bacterial infection or persistent soreness, the dentist may prescribe a dose of antibiotics to return the mucosa to its natural state. This will alleviate soreness and discomfort.

Diluted Hydrogen Peroxide – When poor oral hygiene is causing changes to the soft tissue, the dentist may prescribe a diluted hydrogen peroxide mouthwash. This will kill more bacteria than regular mouthwash and improve halitosis (bad breath).

Oral Surgery – If the patient has cysts or abnormal non-cancerous growths, the dentist may decide to completely remove them. This can improve comfort levels, alleviate breathing problems, and make speech substantially easier depending on the location of the cyst.

Oral Examinations

During the course of a regular check up, the dentist will thoroughly inspect the soft tissue of the mouth and take serious note of any changes. If there are cell changes present, the dentist will take a biopsy of the affected area and send it away to be analyzed by laboratory specialists. When definitive results are obtained, the dentist can decide on the best course of treatment.

Oral Cancer Screenings

An oral cancer screening is usually performed during a comprehensive or recall (check-up) exam. Screening is painless and only takes a few minutes. The dentist or hygienist will use a laser light to assess the soft tissue for cell changes that might be indicative of oral cancer. If such cell changes are present, a small biopsy will be taken and sent to a laboratory for review. If the biopsy indicates that oral cancer is present, an excision (removal) will generally be performed.

If you are experiencing any pain or symptoms that cause you concern, we encourage you to contact us today to schedule an appointment.

Humans have two upper (maxillary) canines and two lower (mandibular) canines. Canine teeth are sometimes referred to as cuspids, fangs, or “eye teeth” because of their direct positioning beneath the eyes. Canine teeth have thicker and more conical roots than incisors and thus have an especially firm connection to the jaw. Canine teeth often have the longest root of all teeth in the human mouth and are the last to fully erupt and fall into place, often around age 13.

An impacted tooth essentially means that it is blocked, stuck, or unable to fully erupt and function properly. Third molars (wisdom teeth) most commonly fall victim to impaction, but the upper canine is the second most common tooth to become impacted. Wisdom teeth serve no important function in the mouth and are frequently removed; however, impacted canines are a critical condition and require treatment for the following reasons:

Closing Gaps – Canines are the last of the front teeth to fall into place and therefore close any unsightly gaps between the other upper teeth.

First Touch – Canines play a vital role in the “biting” mechanism of the teeth. They touch first when the jaw closes, and guide the other teeth into position.

Proper Alignment & Function – Canine teeth are essential to the correct alignment and function of the other teeth on the dental arch. Missing or impacted canines can greatly affect the function and aesthetic appearance of the smile.

What causes canine teeth to become impacted?

There are several main causes for impacted canine teeth:

Extra Teeth – If extra teeth are present, the natural eruption of the canine teeth may be inhibited. The eruption progress of the canine may be directly blocked by an extra tooth or the subsequent overcrowding might leave no room on the dental arch for the canine.

Overcrowding – In some cases, poor alignment of the front teeth can lead to overcrowding. The existing teeth compete for space which means that the canines do not have sufficient room to become functional.

Unusual Growths – On rare occasions, unusual growths on the soft tissue of the gums can restrict the progress of canine teeth, which leads to later impaction.

Early and thorough examination of the teeth can pre-empt problems with impacted canines. It is important for the dentist to document the number teeth present when the patient is around 7 years of age in order to record the presence or absence of canine teeth. The older the patient becomes, the less likely it is that an impacted canine tooth will erupt naturally. If canine teeth are missing or very slow in fully erupting, the dentist can make recommendations for proper treatment.

Oral Examination What does the treatment of impacted canines involve?

If your mouth is overcrowded for any reason, the dentist may recommend extraction of teeth. The extraction will generally be performed under local anesthetic by an oral surgeon. The un-erupted canine will then be exposed by lifting the gum, and guided into place using a special bracket.

Orthognathic surgery refers to the surgical correction needed to fix substantial abnormalities of the maxilla (upper jaw), the mandible (lower jaw), or both. The abnormality may be a birth defect, a growth defect, or the result of traumatic injuries to the jaw area.

Orthognathic surgery is generally performed by an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon to correct malocclusion (bad bite) in cases where routine orthodontic treatment has not or will not be effective. Orthognathic surgeries include the reconstruction of the mandible or maxilla, mandibular ramus, maxilla osteotomy, and mandibular osteotomy.

There are several classifications of malocclusion (the improper coming together of teeth) which may require orthognathic surgery:

Class I Occlusion –This malocclusion means that the lower anterior incisors sit directly behind the upper anterior incisors when the patient bites down. This is considered less destructive than Class II and Class III malocclusions.

Class II Malocclusion – This is identified when the lower anterior incisors lie significantly behind the upper anterior incisors during the biting process; in some cases hitting the soft tissue behind the upper incisors. This is commonly referred to as an overbite and can cause discomfort, bone damage, excessive wear of the front teeth, and tooth loss.

Class III Malocclusion – This is commonly known as an underbite and occurs when the lower anterior incisors and lower jaw are positioned beyond the upper teeth, making the lower jaw much more prominent than the upper jaw.

Reasons for orthognathic surgery

The malocclusion of the teeth can create greatly destructive forces among the five powerful muscles that control the closing and opening of the jaw. These muscles generate a tremendous force when clenching, grinding or chewing. Misalignment can seriously damage the function and aesthetic appearance of the teeth in many ways if left untreated, such as:

Tooth Wear – In the case of an overbite, the pressure and wear on the teeth is not spread evenly. This can also lead to TMJ, migraine headaches, and tooth loss.

Chronic Jaw, Muscle Pain & Headache – The misalignment of the teeth alters the way the facial muscles interact. In some cases, the meniscus cartilage which acts as a buffer between the jawbones can be painfully damaged.

Loose Teeth – When uneven pressure is continually exerted in unintended places or soft tissue is damaged by an overbite, adjacent teeth may become loose in their sockets which causes pain and reduces proper function.

Tooth Sensitivity – As teeth become damaged by constant use, the enamel becomes thinner and the nerves are less protected. This lack of protection can lead to sharp pains when hot or cold foods are eaten.

Difficulty Swallowing, Chewing, or Biting Food – Each can be associated with muscle pain and/or poor alignment of the upper and lower jaws.

What does orthognathic surgery involve?

When the dentist identifies a patient as a candidate for orthognathic surgery, a complete photographic analysis is initially undertaken. This includes panorex x-rays, cephalometric x-rays, models, impressions, and radiographs. Your oral & maxillofacial surgeon, your orthodontist and your dentist will work together and consider how the corrective surgery will impact both proper jaw function and the aesthetic appearance of the entire face.

Generally, orthodontic braces are necessary to align the arches and straighten the teeth prior to the surgery, and additionally, retainers may be used after the surgery. During maxillary surgery, the upper jaw is moved and may be secured in position using tiny plates, wires, rubber bands and screws. Surgery on the mandible is performed using bone grafts to align the lower jaw into the correct position. Orthognathic surgery generally requires a general anesthesia and a good deal of aftercare. Pain medication will be prescribed as necessary, and you’ll be given post treatment advice for your recovery. You may also be provided with a modified diet (if required).

Third molars, commonly referred to as wisdom teeth, are usually the last four of 32 teeth to erupt (surface) in the mouth, generally making their appearance between the ages of 17 to 25. They are located at the back of the mouth (top and bottom), near the entrance to the throat. The term “wisdom” stems from the idea that the molars surface at a time typically associated with increased maturity or “wisdom”.

In most cases, inadequate space in the mouth does not allow the wisdom teeth to erupt properly and become fully functional. When this happens, the tooth can become impacted (stuck) in an undesirable or potentially harmful position. If left untreated, impacted wisdom teeth can contribute to infection, damage to other teeth, and possibly cysts or tumors.

There are several types, or degrees, of impaction based on the actual depth of the teeth within the jaw:

Soft Tissue Impaction: The upper portion of the tooth (the crown) has penetrated through the bone, but the gingiva (gum) is covering part or all of the tooth’s crown and has not positioned properly around the tooth. Because it is difficult to keep the area clean, food can become trapped below the gum and cause an infection and/or tooth decay, resulting in pain and swelling.

Partial Bony Impaction: The tooth has partially erupted, but a portion of the crown remains submerged below the gum and surrounding jawbone. Again, because it is difficult to keep the area clean, infection will commonly occur.

Complete Bony Impaction: The tooth is completely encased by jawbone. This will require more complex removal techniques.

Reasons to remove wisdom teeth

While not all wisdom teeth require removal, wisdom teeth extractions are most often performed because of an active problem such as pain, swelling, decay or infection, or as a preventative measure to avoid serious problems in the future. If impaction of one or more wisdom teeth is present, and left untreated, a number of potentially harmful outcomes can occur, including:

Damage to nearby teeth: Second molars (the teeth directly in front of the wisdom teeth) can be adversely affected by impacted wisdom teeth, resulting in tooth decay (cavities), periodontal disease (gum disease) and possible bone loss.

Disease: Although uncommon, cysts and tumors can occur in the areas surrounding impacted wisdom teeth.

Infection: Bacteria and food can become trapped under the gum tissue, resulting in an infection. The infection can cause considerable pain and danger.

Tooth Crowding: It has been theorized that impacted wisdom teeth can put pressure on other teeth and cause them to become misaligned (crowded or twisted). This theory isn’t universally accepted by all dental professionals, and it has never been validated by any scientific studies.

Wisdom teeth examination

As with any dental procedure, your dentist will want to initially conduct a thorough examination of the wisdom and surrounding teeth. Panoramic or digital x-rays will be taken in order for your dentist to evaluate the position of the wisdom teeth and determine if a current problem exists, or the likelihood of any potential future problems. The x-rays can also expose additional risk factors, such as deterioration or decay of nearby teeth. Early evaluation and treatment (typically in the mid-teen years) is recommended in order to identify potential problems and to improve the results for patients requiring wisdom teeth extractions. Only after a thorough examination can your dentist provide you with the best options for your particular case.

What does the removal of wisdom teeth involve?

Wisdom teeth removal is a common procedure, generally performed under local anesthesia, intravenous (IV) sedation, or general anesthesia by a specially trained dentist in an office surgery suite. The surgery does not require an overnight stay, and you will be released with post-operative instructions and medication (if necessary), to help manage any swelling or discomfort.

The answer to this question is: “it depends.” Each person and situation is different. If you are not currently experiencing pain or crowding, your dentist may recommend removing your wisdom teeth to avoid those types of problems in the future, based on what they see on your x-rays, as well as their professional and clinical experience. Wisdom teeth can move very slowly, so problems can sometimes take years to develop. Extraction of wisdom teeth can become more complicated and painful if delayed, and may require the services of an oral surgeon. Your dentist may recommend removing your wisdom teeth before they become a problem or even cause a future dental emergency.

What is Hair Transplantation?

A hair transplant is a surgical procedure in which hair is removed from a donor area, either on the back or side of the scalp, and is transplanted into areas that are thinning or bald. After the donor hair is transplanted, the hair will continue growing for the rest of the person’s life.

What is Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE)?

FUE is the latest surgical method for hair transplantation. Performed under local anesthesia. During (FUE) Follicular Unit Extraction, the follicular units are harvested from the donor area individually by Dr. Yates using the manual SAFE System and do not need to be dissected under a microscope. FUE requires more technical skill and time. With this technique, the grafts or follicular units can be handpicked for the most robust hairs in anagen or growth phase; whereas, with the strip procedure you have to take all of the follicular units extracted within that strip of hair. With FUE, NO TRANSVERSE SCAR ACROSS THE BACK OF THE HEAD is visible allowing more styling options for patients.

Am I a Good Candidate for Hair Restoration?

In order to determine if you are a good candidate or not, you will need to be evaluated by a hair loss physician or a plastic surgeon who specializes in hair restoration. Your candidacy will be determined based on your stage and extent of hair loss, your age, how much of a donor supply you have and what your expectations are, in addition to other important factors.

How Much Does a Hair Transplant Cost?

The cost for a hair transplant will vary for each patient, since it is dependent on how many grafts you will need. During your initial consultation, you will be provided with all necessary information about the procedure and what the cost will be.

How Long Does the Procedure Take?

Once again, it will depend on how many grafts you need. If a patient requires less than 800 grafts, the procedure will usually take around 4 hours. Patients who need 2500 grafts or more may need to be there for the entire day. Sometimes the procedure will be split over two days. This will all be discussed during your initial consultation.

How Long Does it Take to Heal?

After the procedure, you will experience some redness, swelling and there will be some scabbing. After 10 days, all of these should be completely healed.

Does it really work?

Yes! Hair transplant surgery redistributes existing, healthy hair, which is usually genetically encoded to virtually last a lifetime. Conventional hair transplant growth rates are at about 90-95%.

Will I get a full head of hair?

No. remember, the technique redistributes existing, healthy hair. It does not create any new hair. So it is not possible to provide a full head of hair. However, a comparatively small amount of hair transplanted expertly can produce the illusion of substantially more hair than there actually is. The results will improve how you look to others and to yourself.

How long will it take to grow?

Your transplant will be fully grown approximately 9 months after your All Follicular Unit Megasession.

Will this procedure mean time off from work?

Little or no time off from work is required. But if you are sensitive about how you will look during the days immediately following, you can wear a hat, or, if that's not possible in your work environment, Dr. Mollura recommends beginning the process just before your holidays. Many patients return to work the next day. In fact, many play a round of golf the day following their procedure!

Sun and salt water are said to speed the scalp's healing process, usually producing an acceptable looking appearance after just one week. However, every person is different. Beyond examination, your consultation is a good source to be informed of possible strategies for your unique situation.

Is the procedure painful?

Most patients watch a movie or take a nap while we work. Afterwards, they tell us that during the procedure they felt no pain. Any discomfort they feel afterwards is usually very temporary and nearly always minimal. Approximately 25% of patients elect to take pain relieving pills during the following 1-2 days.

Is the procedure dangerous?

No. It is minor surface surgery, literally only skin deep, and one of the safest surgical procedures ever performed. You are under the care of qualified medical staff at all times. Your transplant takes place (using equipment kept to hospital standards) in a private office.

Is the surgery expensive?

Comparatively, no. While there are costs involved, the benefits of growing your own hair make hair transplantation much more cost-effective than other methods, because afterwards no further expense is incurred. There are no expensive chemicals to be bought or used continually. There are no expensive hair pieces to be maintained, repaired, tinted, conditioned and replaced regularly every 18 months in order to look natural. So, weighed in the light of all possible alternatives, the hair transplant solution is not only the best, but is also the most economical overall.

"I've heard from other hair transplant doctors that mega-sessions don't often grow or can produce disastrous results. Is this true?"

Some doctors who have not kept abreast of these new advanced techniques (They perhaps don't want to go through the extra trouble and expense of purchasing the microscopes, hiring and training the extra staff- and handling the tremendous amount of administrative problems that come with it) often make untrue statements denigrating megasessions. They also probably don't wish to face the learning curve of this obviously more exact procedure.

Be that as it may, many of these doctors won't consider the Binocular Stereoscopic Dissecting Microscope procedure purely in terms of how it will affect their profit margin. Let's face it- these All Follicular Unit Megasessions typically run from 8-12 hours to complete, with the painstaking effort of a large attendant staff. To the average hair transplant doctor, this would greatly increase their workload and overhead. Of course, for them, it would be much easier to say"you can't do over a thousand grafts at one session" or "megasessions produce poor growth and waste hairs", or "megasessions produce too thin a result".

However, in fairness to some of these other doctors, it must be stated that without highly skilled technicians, adequately trained and practiced in the most advanced dissection techniques using the binocular stereoscopic dissecting microscope, and without extreme attention paid to detail at every step along the hair transplant process- other hair transplant facilities, especially those without a lot of experience with megasessions, may well frequently obtain poor results.

How many sessions of surgery will I need?

If you have a completely bald area, it may take two to three surgeries to cover your entire head. If you have an area partially covered with hair, it may take only one surgery to fill in the area. Our goal is to restore about twenty-five percent of the donor's original density in each surgery. After two surgeries, the density is at about fifty percent which is often adequate coverage to satisfy the patient. The time between each session is usually three to four months in order to see how the hair is growing out and to provide more equal distribution.

How long does it take the transplanted hair to grow out enough to fill in the balding area?

Usually it takes three to four months for the hair to grow out. After that it will grow about half an inch per month which is the same rate as the donor hair. Initial hair quality is usually very thin, like baby hair. Then, it becomes coarser over time. Sometimes the initial hair is curlier, then it straightens in about one year. The color of the initial hair may also be darker and later will be lightened by the sun.

How long will the transplanted hair continue to grow?

Basically, the transplanted hair is the hair from the back of the head. Even though it is transplanted, it will still have the same life span. Normally, a hair follicle sheds every three to six years and then grows back from the same root. The transplanted hair continues the same life circle.